slide show

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Yep... I'm a geek

While I was visiting with my parents, I totally confirmed that I'm a geek.  A nerd... the photography type at least {among others.  Who am I kidding!}

I'm lucky enough that my passion for photography came from my family.  We have more than a handful of fine photography enthusiasts in our mix.  But the biggest influence surely was this...
And that's not all of them.  That's just a small sampling of them.  Most of them work.  And most of them are used.

I grew up with these, sitting right here, for as long as I can remember.
My father's passion for photography was always present in our home.  The evening slide shows.  The photos  displayed in our home.  I remember him practicing different techniques.  A natural born teacher, he's currently a darkroom technician at the local community college, where he gets to pass on what he knows and dabble in the darkroom till his heart is content.  And even this weekend, in my home town, I got to see his work hung downtown for everybody else to see.  A little bio about him and his photography and everything.  It's not the first time his work has been hung in a gallery.

This is my father's work horse... among many.  I think it's the most sexy camera that ever existed!  Happy Valentine's Day folks!  This does it for me!  Total geekdom.
It's a 1970 Yashika Mat 2D twin-lens reflex, 2 1/4.  It was the first of it's kind to have a light meter.
This is the camera he took to China when we went to get Mimi.

But maybe that's too new for you.  Here's a 1910's "bicycle camera."  Small enough to easily tote around on one's bicycle.
Cherry wood base with brass hardware.  It was just used a few weeks ago.  

This was my grandmother's camera.  My first Mimi.
It's likely the camera she brought from Chicago to Arizona first on vacations, then as she came here to stay when she married a tall handsome AZ cowboy.  It's a 1930's Kodak Petite designed just for women.
It's turns into a mirrored compact.  And doesn't have many settings so as not to confuse the simple-minded women folk.
How 'bout this little "toy" camera from 1938.  Universal Camera Corp. sold it for 39 cents.  It held 6 exposures, and it is pre-plastic, made of Bakelite.  I grew up in a home where Bakelite was part of everyone's working vocabulary. 
Then he brought out this beauty!
She's a 1915 No. 3 Brownie, Model A by Kodak Eastman complete with a focal plane shutter.  (The shutter slides across the opening one piece, rather than a leaf shutter than we know of today.  

I think this one is pretty stinkin' sexy too.  Think 1950's paparazzi chasing down Marilyn Monroe.  
She's a Century Graphic by Graphlex from 1945.  I'm pretty sure that bulb will blind you in an instant.  
Poor Marilyn.  

And then he brought out this wee little box.  
He had a camera like this one when he was about 10 years old.  My grandfather, the aforementioned cowboy and a WWII vet, likely didn't think very highly of it because of where it was made.  
It cost about $1, which in the 50's was the cost of lunch at McDonalds.  It takes 16mm film.  And I was equally impressed the instructions were also in the box, printed in tissue paper.    
This itty bitty thing is from the 50's.  
Anyone out there have a Zeiss?  Back in the days when they made cameras and not just lenses.  
I was impressed by the amount of settings.  Gotta luv the the Germans for the amazing incorporation of all things technological.  Thank you Germany!   
I don't know a lot about them and am just passing on what he was passing on to me.  If you have any questions, I'll ask him.

See... I told you I was a geek.  

Which one is your favorite?

14 comments:

  1. I love old cameras. I didn't know you could get film for some of them. I have a small collection. You are not a geek!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, as it was explained to me... 16mm film is 35mm film turned on it's side. And since my dad has access to a darkroom I'm sure that could be managed even if the other side could be cut down. I know he has jury rigged film before. And the plate film seems to be pretty available.

      Delete
  2. Love that 16mm - the original "spy camera" - think of how many documents were photographed with camera's like that! And the Zeiss - I noted that the film speed is marked in DIN vs. ASA - extremely cool! Thanks for the profile on your dad - he impresses me as a cool guy!

    hugs - aus and co.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love these! What an impressive collection. WOW!

    ReplyDelete
  4. These are amazing! Not a geek, just a lover of very cool things!

    ReplyDelete
  5. If the truth is told my wife loves everything about her Papa and for good reason. Her love for photography is born from and the direct extension of her love for her dad and her love of family. @Aus - Her dad is a cool guy, I have had the pleasure of getting to know him for nearly 30 years now and you nailed it on the head.

    ReplyDelete
  6. The 1945 century graphic. Not that I know anything at all about cameras. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ya that's my favorite too! Something about just visualizing some reporter running around with it in the 50's.

      Delete
  7. Love love them all! Crazy about the color of the made for women one. I'm the simple minded sucker they were targeting. Buying on looks alone. Ha ha.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ya, the green ladies camera is my favorite too even if it is only because it was my grandmothers. Gotta luv the art deco look of it! My dad said it also came in other colors too, blue and red I think.

      Delete
  8. What a beautiful collection and all in mint condition with the original box, instructions, etc.! Your family sure took good care of these treasures! Love them all and thanks for sharing! Would love to see the photos that come out of each camera! Have a great weekend, Wen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are film cameras so I don't have JPEG unless I make them. Let me see if I can rustle something up. They're not all mint. For example the bellows in the green one just aren't good and thus can't take pics anymore without light leaks. Probably could be repaired but probably not worth it. And the bicycle camera has a bellows repair with grey take if you look closely.

      Delete
  9. They are all amazing! I especially love the Kodak petite! They would be fantastic props! Have a great weekend.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
 
Design by Deluxe Designs
all rights reserved. 2011